Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed328    
    Printed14    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded44    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

Feasibility, safety, and efficacy of iron bioresorbable scaffold in neonates with duct-dependent pulmonary circulation


1 Paediatric and Congenital Heart Centre, Institut Jantung Negara (National Heart Institute), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2 Department of Paediatric, Hospital Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
3 National and Local Joint Engineering Laboratory of Interventional Medical Biotechnology and System, Lifetech Scientific (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd., Shenzhen, China

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Marhisham Che Mood
Paediatric & Congenital Heart Centre, Institut Jantung Negara (National Heart Institute), Kuala Lumpur
Malaysia
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.apc_187_21

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2022  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 147-153

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (1,423 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
Introduction: Bioresorbable stent has the theoretical advantage in the pediatric age group; however, experience in the literature is very limited. Objectives: This pilot study sought to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and performance of iron bioresorbable scaffold (IBS Angel™) as short-term palliation in lesions with noncomplex patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Materials and Methods: Nine neonates with duct dependent but dual-source pulmonary blood flow (PBF) were included. Major stent-related complications, in-hospital course, stent patency up to 6 months, and unplanned re-interventions were studied, as well the percentage of stent material resorbed in patients in whom the stents were explanted at the surgery. Results: IBS Angel™ was successfully implanted in all nine patients (mean weight range 3.4 ± 0.4 kg). Six were pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and 1 critical pulmonary stenosis patients where PDA stenting was done together or after balloon dilation. The mean procedure and fluoroscopy times were 89 ± 39 min and 16.3 ± 6.9 min, respectively. There were no major complications such as stent thrombosis or embolization and there were no in-hospital deaths. Post procedure overshunting and prolonged ventilatory support was a prominent feature. The median ventilation days was 3 (1–11 days). One patient died after 1 month due to respiratory syncytial virus pneumonia at the referring hospital. At 6 months follow-up, four had patent stents and four had blocked or restrictive stent flow. One patient received re-stenting at 4 months for restrictive stent flow. In three patients where microcomputed tomography of explanted stent was available, resorption of iron was 15% at 6 months and >65% at 16 months. Conclusions: Ductal stenting with IBS Angel™ is feasible and safe in selected patients. Because of early luminal loss, its use may be recommended for lesions with dual-source PBF with noncomplex PDA morphology that requires a short duration of palliation.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
 




1 Paediatric and Congenital Heart Centre, Institut Jantung Negara (National Heart Institute), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2 Department of Paediatric, Hospital Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
3 National and Local Joint Engineering Laboratory of Interventional Medical Biotechnology and System, Lifetech Scientific (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd., Shenzhen, China

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Marhisham Che Mood
Paediatric & Congenital Heart Centre, Institut Jantung Negara (National Heart Institute), Kuala Lumpur
Malaysia
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.apc_187_21

Rights and Permissions

Introduction: Bioresorbable stent has the theoretical advantage in the pediatric age group; however, experience in the literature is very limited. Objectives: This pilot study sought to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and performance of iron bioresorbable scaffold (IBS Angel™) as short-term palliation in lesions with noncomplex patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Materials and Methods: Nine neonates with duct dependent but dual-source pulmonary blood flow (PBF) were included. Major stent-related complications, in-hospital course, stent patency up to 6 months, and unplanned re-interventions were studied, as well the percentage of stent material resorbed in patients in whom the stents were explanted at the surgery. Results: IBS Angel™ was successfully implanted in all nine patients (mean weight range 3.4 ± 0.4 kg). Six were pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and 1 critical pulmonary stenosis patients where PDA stenting was done together or after balloon dilation. The mean procedure and fluoroscopy times were 89 ± 39 min and 16.3 ± 6.9 min, respectively. There were no major complications such as stent thrombosis or embolization and there were no in-hospital deaths. Post procedure overshunting and prolonged ventilatory support was a prominent feature. The median ventilation days was 3 (1–11 days). One patient died after 1 month due to respiratory syncytial virus pneumonia at the referring hospital. At 6 months follow-up, four had patent stents and four had blocked or restrictive stent flow. One patient received re-stenting at 4 months for restrictive stent flow. In three patients where microcomputed tomography of explanted stent was available, resorption of iron was 15% at 6 months and >65% at 16 months. Conclusions: Ductal stenting with IBS Angel™ is feasible and safe in selected patients. Because of early luminal loss, its use may be recommended for lesions with dual-source PBF with noncomplex PDA morphology that requires a short duration of palliation.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article