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Necrotizing enterocolitis and congenital heart disease


1 UCL Medical School, University College London, London, United Kingdom
2 Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
3 School of Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom
4 Department of Paediatric Intensive care, Alder Hey Children's Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom
5 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital; Department of Congenital Cardiac Surgery, Alder Hey Children Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Mr. Amer Harky
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital, Thomas Drive, L14 3PE
United Kingdom
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.apc_30_21

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Year : 2021  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 507-515

 

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Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remains a prominent surgical emergency among infant population, associated with a significant mortality, as well as various subsequent morbidities. Congenital heart disease (CHD) has an increased associated incidence with NEC in infant population. Recent research has provided insight into the pathophysiology of NEC in patients with CHD and how this differs from those without CHD. The deviation from normal circulatory physiology has a suggested association in the pathophysiology of NEC in CHD, which may have implications for the risk factors of NEC in infants with CHD, the effect on outcomes of NEC, and whether alternative approaches to management may need to be considered in comparison to classical NEC. This review aims to highlight studies that provide insight and awareness into the relationship between NEC and CHD, in order that clinicians may direct themselves more clearly toward optimal management for infants in this category.






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1 UCL Medical School, University College London, London, United Kingdom
2 Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
3 School of Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom
4 Department of Paediatric Intensive care, Alder Hey Children's Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom
5 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital; Department of Congenital Cardiac Surgery, Alder Hey Children Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Mr. Amer Harky
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital, Thomas Drive, L14 3PE
United Kingdom
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.apc_30_21

Rights and Permissions

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remains a prominent surgical emergency among infant population, associated with a significant mortality, as well as various subsequent morbidities. Congenital heart disease (CHD) has an increased associated incidence with NEC in infant population. Recent research has provided insight into the pathophysiology of NEC in patients with CHD and how this differs from those without CHD. The deviation from normal circulatory physiology has a suggested association in the pathophysiology of NEC in CHD, which may have implications for the risk factors of NEC in infants with CHD, the effect on outcomes of NEC, and whether alternative approaches to management may need to be considered in comparison to classical NEC. This review aims to highlight studies that provide insight and awareness into the relationship between NEC and CHD, in order that clinicians may direct themselves more clearly toward optimal management for infants in this category.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
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