Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
BRIEF COMMUNICATION  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed852    
    Printed10    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded62    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

Pulmonary valve infective endocarditis: A case series


Department of Cardiology, Bombay Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Gunjan Arvindbhai Malavia
Bombay Hospital and Medical Research Center, 711, 7th Floor MRC Building, Mumbai - 400 020, Maharashtra
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.apc_14_21

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2021  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 496-500

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (537 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
Background and Objectives : Infective endocarditis (IE) involving the native pulmonary valve (PV) is extremely rare, with no data in Indian literature. The objective of this communication is to describe the clinical and diagnostic characteristics, underlying risk factors, microbiological features, and management of PVIE. Methods : This is a retrospective analysis of 8 cases of PVIE managed in a tertiary care center from 1992 to 2020. Results : PVIE was observed in 8 patients with underlying congenital cardiac malformation (Group A, 6 Patients) and in patients with central venous catheter (Group B, 2 patients). All the patients had prolonged febrile illness accompanied by right heart failure 4 (50%), septic pulmonary emboli 2 (25%), and pulmonary regurgitation 3 (37.5%). Trans-thoracic echocardiography demonstrated the vegetations, whereas computed tomography of chest diagnosed pulmonary emboli in 2 (25%), and pulmonary artery aneurysm in 1 (12.5%) patient. The early mortality was extremely high (5, 62.5%). Delayed diagnosis, fulminant septicemia, and multi-organ failure resulted in unfavorable outcomes. Conclusions : IE of the native PV is a rare and potentially lethal illness. Diagnosis should be considered in any febrile patient with an underlying congenital defect, central venous line, bacteremia, and comorbidities. Multi-modality imaging should be utilized to enhance the diagnostic yield and detect complications promptly.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 BRIEF COMMUNICATION
 




Department of Cardiology, Bombay Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Gunjan Arvindbhai Malavia
Bombay Hospital and Medical Research Center, 711, 7th Floor MRC Building, Mumbai - 400 020, Maharashtra
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.apc_14_21

Rights and Permissions

Background and Objectives : Infective endocarditis (IE) involving the native pulmonary valve (PV) is extremely rare, with no data in Indian literature. The objective of this communication is to describe the clinical and diagnostic characteristics, underlying risk factors, microbiological features, and management of PVIE. Methods : This is a retrospective analysis of 8 cases of PVIE managed in a tertiary care center from 1992 to 2020. Results : PVIE was observed in 8 patients with underlying congenital cardiac malformation (Group A, 6 Patients) and in patients with central venous catheter (Group B, 2 patients). All the patients had prolonged febrile illness accompanied by right heart failure 4 (50%), septic pulmonary emboli 2 (25%), and pulmonary regurgitation 3 (37.5%). Trans-thoracic echocardiography demonstrated the vegetations, whereas computed tomography of chest diagnosed pulmonary emboli in 2 (25%), and pulmonary artery aneurysm in 1 (12.5%) patient. The early mortality was extremely high (5, 62.5%). Delayed diagnosis, fulminant septicemia, and multi-organ failure resulted in unfavorable outcomes. Conclusions : IE of the native PV is a rare and potentially lethal illness. Diagnosis should be considered in any febrile patient with an underlying congenital defect, central venous line, bacteremia, and comorbidities. Multi-modality imaging should be utilized to enhance the diagnostic yield and detect complications promptly.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article